Citrine Meaning & Properties

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Properties of Citrine

Mineral Group

Tectosilicates

Cleavage

Indistict 

Chemical Composition 

SiO2

Fracture 

Conchoidal

Luster

Glassy, vitreous

Diaphaneity

Translucent to nearly opaque

Color

Yellow - orange

Streak

White

Mohs Hardness

7

Specific Gravity

2.65

Diagnostic Properties

Hardness, color, streak, luster

Crystal System

Trigonal

Uses

Gemstones, sculptures

Chakras

Sacral and Solar Plexus Chakras

Zodiac

Sagittarius

Numerical Vibration

6

Metaphysical Uses 

 Citrine has been called the "success stone," the "merchant's stone," and the "money stone." Because of its yellow hue, citrine is regarded as a joyful stone whose sun-like energy will enliven individuals who work with and wear it.
Yellow is the color of the solar plexus chakra, hence citrine is related with it. It is said to have a beneficial effect that helps alleviate backache and counteract depression, bad energy, and issues with the liver, spleen, digestive system, and bladder.

Note: All crystals contain energy that can be used to amplify your own intentions and manifestations through meditation and daily wear.

Geologic Setting: 

Citrine, amethyst, aventurine, and rose quartz are all macrocrystalline forms of quartz. The mineral is composed of silicon dioxide.
Transparent citrine specimens with good color are quite uncommon. The finest specimens are found in Brazil, Madagascar, and the former Soviet Union. Additionally, the stone is discovered in Colorado, Spain, France, and Scotland.
Rare are natural citrines. Most citrine on the market is amethyst or smokey quartz that has been heated. In contrast to smokey quartz, Brazilian amethyst changes color at a lower temperature (572 degrees to 752 degrees). These stones that have been heated have a little crimson hue.
Citrine is sometimes mistaken with yellow topaz, yellow beryl, and yellow tourmaline due to its hue. Similar to other members of the quartz family, citrine crystal veins commonly originate from molten magma or from a mineral solution in the rock that precipitates. Brazil, the main producer, as well as the United States, Madagascar, Argentina, Myanmar (Burma), Namibia, Russia, Scotland, and Spain have mined deposits of citrine with a natural hue.

 

For additional information, see the page on Citrine.

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